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[this is a data cube dataset] A data cube dataset in folders : Scottish Government, Crime and Justice

Crime Clear up Rates

Crimes cleared up by the police as a percentage of those recorded.

View as a spreadsheet
Dimensions
Dimension
Value
Crime Or Offence
  1. All Crime
  2. All Crimes And Offences Excluding Motor Vehicle
  3. All Other Crimes
  4. Attempted Murders And Serious Assaults
  5. Breach Of The Peace
  6. Common Assaults
  7. Crimes Against Property
  8. Crimes Against Public Justice
  9. Crimes Against The Person
  10. Crimes Associated With Prostitution
  11. Crimes Of Dishonesty
  12. Crimes Of Fire-Raising And Vandalism Etc.
  13. Domestic Housebreakings
  14. Drugs
  15. Drunkenness
  16. Fire-Raising
  17. Fraud
  18. Handling An Offensive Weapon
  19. Homicide Etc
  20. Housebreakings
  21. Miscellaneous Offences
  22. Non-Sexual Crimes Of Violence
  23. Other Crimes Of Dishonesty
  24. Other Miscellaneous Offences
  25. Other Non-Sexual Crimes Of Violence
  26. Other Other Crimes
  27. Other Sexual Crimes
  28. Other Theft
  29. Rapes And Attempted Rapes
  30. Robbery
  31. Sexual Assault
  32. Sexual Crimes
  33. Shoplifting
  34. Theft By Opening A Lockfast Place (OLP)
  35. Theft From A Motor Vehicle (OLP)
  36. Theft Of Motor Vehicles
  37. Vandalism
Measure Type
  1. Ratio
Reference Period
  1. 1996
  2. 1997
  3. 1998
  4. 1999
  5. 2000
  6. 2001
  7. 2002
  8. 2003
  9. 2004
  10. 2005
  11. 2006
  12. 2007
  13. 2008
  14. 2009
  15. 2010
  16. 2011
  17. 2012
Reference Area
(showing types of area available in these data)
  1. Countries
  2. Council Areas
  3. Health Board Areas
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CSVN-Triples
About the Dataset
Contact
Publisher
Scottish Government
Creator
Scottish Government
In folders
License
Issued
29/07/2014
Modified
09/02/2016
Next update due
Not supplied
Description

Crimes cleared up by the police as a percentage of those recorded.

For more information on the recorded crime figures see http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Topics/Statistics/Browse/Crime-Justice/PubRecordedCrime.

The current definition of “cleared up” came into force with effect from 1 April 1996 and states that a crime or offence is regarded as cleared up where there exists a sufficiency of evidence under Scots law, to justify consideration of criminal proceedings.

Clear up rates are calculated as follows: (number of recorded crimes cleared up / total number of recorded crimes) x (100 / 1).

The statistical return from which the data are taken is a simple count of the numbers of crimes and offences recorded and cleared up by the police. Returns are submitted quarterly from Police Scotland at local authority level which allows a national total to be obtained.

Crimes and offences are included against the year in which they are recorded by the police. This is not necessarily the year in which the crime or offence took place, the year in which the accused is brought to trial for the crime or offence, or the year in which the case is finally disposed of by the courts.

Amendments (such as the deletion of incidents found on investigation not to be criminal) which arise after the end of the financial year are not incorporated.

Contraventions of Scottish criminal law are divided for statistical purposes into crimes and offences. “Crime” is generally used for the more serious criminal acts; the less serious termed “offences”, although the term “offence” may also be used in relation to serious breaches of criminal law. The distinction is made only for working purposes and the “seriousness” of the offence is generally related to the maximum sentence that can be imposed.

For further information see http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Topics/Statistics/Browse/Crime-Justice/DataSource/RecordedCrimeSandS.

Details
Confidentiality Policy
Not supplied
Quality Management
Not supplied
Accuracy and Reliability

SCJS estimates are based on a representative sample of the population of Scotland aged 16 or over living in private households. A sample, as used in the SCJS, is a small-scale representation of the population from which it is drawn.

Any sample survey may produce estimates that differ from the values that would have been obtained if the whole population had been interviewed. The magnitude of these differences is related to the size and variability of the estimate, and the design of the survey, including sample size.

It is however possible to calculate the range of values between which the population figures are estimated to lie; known as the confidence interval (also referred to as margin of error).

Confidence Intervals and further information are are presented in the SCJS reports and Technical Reports.

Coherence and Comparability

Crime and victimisation surveys have been carried out in Scotland since the early 1980s. The geographical coverage, sample size, method and fieldwork and reference periods have varied across previous crime surveys.

Past Scottish crime and victimisation surveys 1982, 1988: British Crime Survey (BCS) included coverage of central and southern Scotland only (c. 5,000 interviews).

1993: First independent Scottish Crime Survey (SCS) launched, based on BCS and covering the whole of Scotland (c. 5,000 interviews).

1996, 2000, 2003: Further sweeps of the SCS (c. 5,000 interviews).

2004, 2006: Scottish Crime and Victimisation Survey (SCVS) (c. 27,000 interviews in 2004, c. 5,000 interviews in 2006).

2008/09, 2009/10, 2010/11: Scottish Crime and Justice Survey (SCJS) (c. 16,000 interviews 2008/09 and 2009/10, c. 13,000 interviews in 2010/11).

The SCJS was launched in April 2008, and represented a major departure from the design, methodology and sample size of previous surveys. The main changes introduced with the SCJS were an increase in the sample size and a move to continuous fieldwork throughout the financial year using a rolling reference period for the victimisation module. The increase in sample size enhances the statistical reliability of the estimates produced by the survey.

The design of the 2012/13 SCJS remains broadly similar to the 2008/09 to 2010/11 survey designs, although the sample size and fequency both reduced from 2010/11 onwards.

Accessibility and Clarity

Information is presented in summary reports and background data across many survey questions is published by key demographics and sub-national geographies. Datasets are deposited on the UK Data Archive, and can be interrogated there using their NESSTAR analysis tool.

Relevance

These indicators are derived from the Scottish Crime and Justice Survey. The SCJS is a large-scale social survey which asks people about their experiences and perceptions of crime.

The survey is important because it provides a picture of crime in Scotland, including crimes that haven’t been reported to, or recorded by the police.

An important role of the SCJS is to provide an alternative and complementary measure of crime to the police recorded crime statistics, which provide statistics on crimes and offences recorded and cleared up by the police in Scotland.

Timeliness and Punctuality

Reporting of each survey sweep follows detailed weighting and quality assurance processes.

Revisions
Not supplied
URI

This is a linked data resource: it has a permanent unique uri at which both humans and machines can find it on the Internet, and which can be used an identifier in queries on our SPARQL endpoint.

http://statistics.gov.scot/data/crime-clear-up-rates
Dimensions Linked Data

A linked data-orientated view of dimensions and values

Dimension Locked Value
Crime Or Offence
http://statistics.gov.scot/def/dimension/crimeOrOffence
(not locked to a value)
Reference Area
http://purl.org/linked-data/sdmx/2009/dimension#refArea
(not locked to a value)
Reference Period
http://purl.org/linked-data/sdmx/2009/dimension#refPeriod
(not locked to a value)
Measure Type
http://purl.org/linked-data/cube#measureType
(not locked to a value)
Graphs

Linked Data is stored in graphs. We keep dataset contents (the data) separately from the metadata, to make it easier for you to find exactly what you need.

The data in this dataset are stored in the graph: http://statistics.gov.scot/graph/crime-clear-up-rates

The data structure definition for this data cube dataset is stored in the same graph as the data: http://statistics.gov.scot/graph/crime-clear-up-rates

All other metadata about this dataset are stored in the graph: http://statistics.gov.scot/graph/crime-clear-up-rates/metadata

Linked Data Resources

A breakdown by type of the 24,875 resources in this dataset's data graph.

Resource type Number of resources
Collection 2
Component specification 6
Data structure definition 1
Observation 24,866
All metadata
In Graph http://statistics.gov.scot/graph/crime-clear-up-rates/metadata
Accessibility and Clarity http://statistics.gov.scot/def/statistical-quality/accessibility-and-clarity
Information is presented in summary reports and background data across many survey questions is published by key demographics and sub-national geographies. Datasets are deposited on the UK Data Archive, and can be interrogated there using their NESSTAR analysis tool. xsd:string
Accuracy and Reliability http://statistics.gov.scot/def/statistical-quality/accuracy-and-reliability
SCJS estimates are based on a representative sample of the population of Scotland aged 16 or over living in private households. A sample, as used in the SCJS, is a small-scale representation of the population from which it is drawn. Any sample survey may produce estimates that differ from the values that would have been obtained if the whole population had been interviewed. The magnitude of these differences is related to the size and variability of the estimate, and the design of the survey, including sample size. It is however possible to calculate the range of values between which the population figures are estimated to lie; known as the confidence interval (also referred to as margin of error). Confidence Intervals and further information are are presented in the SCJS reports and Technical Reports. xsd:string
Comment rdfs:comment http://www.w3.org/2000/01/rdf-schema#comment
Crimes cleared up by the police as a percentage of those recorded. xsd:string
Comparability and Coherence http://statistics.gov.scot/def/statistical-quality/comparability-and-coherence
Crime and victimisation surveys have been carried out in Scotland since the early 1980s. The geographical coverage, sample size, method and fieldwork and reference periods have varied across previous crime surveys. Past Scottish crime and victimisation surveys 1982, 1988: British Crime Survey (BCS) included coverage of central and southern Scotland only (c. 5,000 interviews). 1993: First independent Scottish Crime Survey (SCS) launched, based on BCS and covering the whole of Scotland (c. 5,000 interviews). 1996, 2000, 2003: Further sweeps of the SCS (c. 5,000 interviews). 2004, 2006: Scottish Crime and Victimisation Survey (SCVS) (c. 27,000 interviews in 2004, c. 5,000 interviews in 2006). 2008/09, 2009/10, 2010/11: Scottish Crime and Justice Survey (SCJS) (c. 16,000 interviews 2008/09 and 2009/10, c. 13,000 interviews in 2010/11). The SCJS was launched in April 2008, and represented a major departure from the design, methodology and sample size of previous surveys. The main changes introduced with the SCJS were an increase in the sample size and a move to continuous fieldwork throughout the financial year using a rolling reference period for the victimisation module. The increase in sample size enhances the statistical reliability of the estimates produced by the survey. The design of the 2012/13 SCJS remains broadly similar to the 2008/09 to 2010/11 survey designs, although the sample size and fequency both reduced from 2010/11 onwards. xsd:string
Contact email http://publishmydata.com/def/dataset#contactEmail
mailto:statistics.enquiries@scotland.gsi.gov.uk
Creator dcterms:creator http://purl.org/dc/terms/creator
Scottish Government http://statistics.gov.scot/id/organisation/scottish-government
Date Issued dcterms:issued http://purl.org/dc/terms/issued
July 29, 2014 02:00 xsd:dateTime
Date Modified dcterms:modified http://purl.org/dc/terms/modified
February 09, 2016 15:22 xsd:dateTime
Description dcterms:description http://purl.org/dc/terms/description
Crimes cleared up by the police as a percentage of those recorded. For more information on the recorded crime figures see [http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Topics/Statistics/Browse/Crime-Justice/PubRecordedCrime](http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Topics/Statistics/Browse/Crime-Justice/PubRecordedCrime). The current definition of “cleared up” came into force with effect from 1 April 1996 and states that a crime or offence is regarded as cleared up where there exists a sufficiency of evidence under Scots law, to justify consideration of criminal proceedings. Clear up rates are calculated as follows: (number of recorded crimes cleared up / total number of recorded crimes) x (100 / 1). The statistical return from which the data are taken is a simple count of the numbers of crimes and offences recorded and cleared up by the police. Returns are submitted quarterly from Police Scotland at local authority level which allows a national total to be obtained. Crimes and offences are included against the year in which they are recorded by the police. This is not necessarily the year in which the crime or offence took place, the year in which the accused is brought to trial for the crime or offence, or the year in which the case is finally disposed of by the courts. Amendments (such as the deletion of incidents found on investigation not to be criminal) which arise after the end of the financial year are not incorporated. Contraventions of Scottish criminal law are divided for statistical purposes into crimes and offences. “Crime” is generally used for the more serious criminal acts; the less serious termed “offences”, although the term “offence” may also be used in relation to serious breaches of criminal law. The distinction is made only for working purposes and the “seriousness” of the offence is generally related to the maximum sentence that can be imposed. For further information see [http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Topics/Statistics/Browse/Crime-Justice/DataSource/RecordedCrimeSandS](http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Topics/Statistics/Browse/Crime-Justice/DataSource/RecordedCrimeSandS). xsd:string
Graph http://publishmydata.com/def/dataset#graph
http://statistics.gov.scot/graph/crime-clear-up-rates
Has a SPARQL endpoint at void:sparqlEndpoint http://rdfs.org/ns/void#sparqlEndpoint
http://statistics.gov.scot/sparql
In folder http://publishmydata.com/def/ontology/folder/inFolder
Scottish Government http://statistics.gov.scot/def/concept/folders/organisations/scottish-government
Crime and Justice http://statistics.gov.scot/def/concept/folders/themes/crime-and-justice
Label rdfs:label http://www.w3.org/2000/01/rdf-schema#label
Crime Clear up Rates xsd:string
License dcterms:license http://purl.org/dc/terms/license
http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/doc/open-government-licence/version/2/
Publisher dcterms:publisher http://purl.org/dc/terms/publisher
Scottish Government http://statistics.gov.scot/id/organisation/scottish-government
References dcterms:references http://purl.org/dc/terms/references
http://docs.publishmydata.com
Relevance http://statistics.gov.scot/def/statistical-quality/relevance
These indicators are derived from the Scottish Crime and Justice Survey. The SCJS is a large-scale social survey which asks people about their experiences and perceptions of crime. The survey is important because it provides a picture of crime in Scotland, including crimes that haven’t been reported to, or recorded by the police. An important role of the SCJS is to provide an alternative and complementary measure of crime to the police recorded crime statistics, which provide statistics on crimes and offences recorded and cleared up by the police in Scotland. xsd:string
Theme dcat:theme http://www.w3.org/ns/dcat#theme
Crime and Justice http://statistics.gov.scot/def/concept/folders/themes/crime-and-justice
Timeliness and Punctuality http://statistics.gov.scot/def/statistical-quality/timeliness-and-punctuality
Reporting of each survey sweep follows detailed weighting and quality assurance processes. xsd:string
Title dcterms:title http://purl.org/dc/terms/title
Crime Clear up Rates xsd:string
Type rdf:type http://www.w3.org/1999/02/22-rdf-syntax-ns#type
Data set http://purl.org/linked-data/cube#DataSet
Dataset http://publishmydata.com/def/dataset#Dataset
http://publishmydata.com/def/dataset#LinkedDataset
dataset http://rdfs.org/ns/void#Dataset
Dataset http://www.w3.org/ns/dcat#Dataset
In Graph http://statistics.gov.scot/graph/crime-clear-up-rates
Structure qb:structure http://purl.org/linked-data/cube#structure
http://statistics.gov.scot/data/structure/crime-clear-up-rates http://statistics.gov.scot/data/structure/crime-clear-up-rates
Machine-readable formats

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