add cart choropleth column cross cube error file folder geo help home lock obs poi rdf remove search slice spreadsheet success table unlock warning

[this is a data cube dataset] A data cube dataset in folders : Scottish Government, Community Wellbeing and Social Environment

Poverty (children)

Official Statistics of the number and proportions of children in poverty. Various poverty measures and breakdowns are available.

View as a spreadsheet
Dimensions
Dimension
Value
Age
  1. 13 years and over
  2. 5-12 years
  3. All
  4. 0-4 years
Age Of Mother
  1. All
  2. Mother under 25 in household
  3. No mother under 25 in household
Age Of Youngest Child
  1. All
  2. Youngest child in household is one or older
  3. Youngest child in household is younger than one
Ethnicity
  1. Asian or Asian British
  2. Mixed, Black or Black British, and Other
  3. White - British
  4. White - Other
  5. All
Family Employment Status
  1. All
  2. All in full-time work
  3. Couple: one full-time, one not in paid work
  4. Couple: one full-time, one part-time
  5. Inactive or retired
  6. Part-time work only
  7. Self-employed (at least one full-time)
  8. Unemployed
Household Disability Status
  1. All
  2. With disabled adult(s)
  3. With disabled child(ren)
  4. With disabled person(s)
  5. With no disabled adult(s)
  6. With no disabled child(ren)
  7. With no disabled person(s)
Housing Costs
  1. After Housing Costs
  2. Before Housing Costs
Indicator (Poverty)
  1. Absolute poverty
  2. Combined low income and material deprivation
  3. Relative poverty
  4. Relative poverty (disability adjustment)
  5. Severe poverty
  6. Severe poverty (disability adjustment)
Measure Type
  1. Count
  2. Ratio
Number Of Children In Household
  1. All
  2. One
  3. Three or more
  4. Two
Reference Period
  1. 1994/95-1996/97
  2. 1995/96-1997/98
  3. 1996/97-1998/99
  4. 1997/98-1999/00
  5. 1998/99-2000/01
  6. 1999/00-2001/02
  7. 2000/01-2002/03
  8. 2001/02-2003/04
  9. 2002/03-2004/05
  10. 2003/04-2005/06
  11. 2004/05-2006/07
  12. 2005/06-2007/08
  13. 2006/07-2008/09
  14. 2007/08-2009/10
  15. 2008/09-2010/11
  16. 2009/10-2011/12
  17. 2010/11-2012/13
  18. 2011/12-2013/14
  19. 2012/13-2014/15
  20. 2013/14-2015/16
  21. 2014/15-2016/17
  22. 2015/16-2017/18
  23. 2015/16-2019/20
  24. 2016/17-2018/19
  25. 2017/18-2019/20
Single Parenthood
  1. All
  2. No single parent in household
  3. Single parent in household
Type Of Tenure
  1. All
  2. Owned Mortgage/Loan
  3. Owned Outright
  4. Private Rented
  5. Social Rented
Urban Rural Classification
  1. All
  2. Rural
  3. Urban
Work Status
  1. All
  2. No one in household in paid work
  3. Someone in household in paid work
Reference Area
(showing types of area available in these data)
  1. Countries
Download
Entire dataset
Note: These may be large files.
CSVN-Triples
About the Dataset
Contact
Publisher
Scottish Government
Creator
Scottish Government
In folders
License
Issued
12/05/2021
Modified
04/03/2022
Next update due
March 2023
Description

National Statistics of the number and proportions of people living in private households with an equivalised household income below various poverty thresholds. For commentary and charts, please find the full report on gov.scot.

The different poverty datasets refer to different subgroups of the population. Datasets are available for:

  • all people
  • children (this dataset)
  • working age adults
  • pensionable age adults
  • all adults
  • single adults

More detail for each dataset and the available breakdowns follows further below.

Figures are presented as three-year rolling averages to ensure robust time series analyses. Ethnicity and religion breakdowns are presented as five-year averages due to small sample sizes. Only the latest estimates of the ethnicity and religion breakdowns are provided, because estimates fluctuate between years, and the measurement uncertainty is fairly large. The reason for this is that ethnic and religious composition of the population are not accounted for in the survey weighting process, and therefore the ethnic and religious composition of the population is not accurately captured.

Where estimates are suppressed due to small sample size this is marked with an asterisk ("*"). Where estimates are missing for other reasons this is marked with a hyphen ("-"). Other reasons include changes in the methodology, or data being unavailable in some years.

The income measure used is equivalised net disposable income before and after housing costs. The before housing costs measure is income from all sources (including earnings, benefits, tax credits, pensions, and investments) after deductions for income tax, national insurance contributions, council tax, pension contributions and maintenance payments. The after housing costs measure further deducts housing costs such as rent and/or mortgage payments.

Equivalisation sums the income of all householders, adjusts it to reflect the composition of the household, and applies the resulting income to all householders. Private Scottish Households refers to all households that are not communal establishments such as hostels, prisons or hospitals, for example. The median is the middle value when the household income of all individuals in the UK are ranked in order. Sixty percent of the median is an internationally recognised poverty threshold.

Different poverty indicators measure different aspects of poverty.

Relative poverty: Individuals living in households whose equivalised income is below 60% of UK median income in the same year. This is a measure of whether those in the lowest income households are keeping pace with the growth of incomes in the economy as a whole.

Absolute poverty: Individuals living in households whose equivalised income is below 60% of inflation adjusted UK median income in 2010/11. This is a measure of whether those in the lowest income households are seeing their incomes rise in real terms.

Severe poverty: Similar to relative poverty, but with a threshold of 50% of UK median income in the same year. This is a measure of deeper poverty, identifying people in households further below the poverty line.

Relative and severe poverty (disability adjustment): Some illnesses and disabilities incur additional living costs. The poverty measures do not normally consider this. Research shows that additional costs associated with disability vary greatly in level and nature. There is no general agreement on how to measure these costs. In this measure, any payments in Disability Living Allowance, Attendance Allowance and Personal Independence Payments were deducted from total household income. These benefits are paid as a contribution towards the additional living costs for disabled people. This income is excluded from total household income, and a new poverty line based on the adjusted incomes is calculated.

Combined low income and material deprivation: measures living standards of children, and refers to the inability of households to afford basic goods and activities that are seen as necessities in society.

The data source is the Department for Work and Pensions' Family Resources Survey (Households Below Average Income dataset).

Working age adults are defined as all individuals aged 16 and over but below state pension age, except unmarried 16 to 19 year-olds in full-time non-advanced education, who are considered children. Adults are defined as all working age and pensionable age adults.

For further information on the methodology used to create these statistics, please see the poverty methodology pages on gov.scot. More poverty analysis is available on the poverty pages on gov.scot.

AVAILABLE POVERTY DATASETS

Poverty (all people)

Relative, absolute, and severe poverty both, before and after housing costs, broken down by:

  • Ethnicity
  • Household disability status
  • Number of children in the household
  • Tenure
  • Urban / rural class

Poverty (children)

Relative, absolute, and severe poverty, and combined low income and material deprivation both, before and after housing costs, broken down by:

  • Age of child
  • Age of youngest child in the household
  • Age of mother
  • Ethnicity
  • Family employment status
  • Household disability status
  • Household work status
  • Number of children in the household
  • Single parenthood
  • Tenure
  • Urban / rural class

Poverty (working age adults)

Relative, absolute, and severe poverty both, before and after housing costs, broken down by:

  • Family employment status
  • Household work status

Poverty (pensionable age adults)

Relative, absolute, and severe poverty both, before and after housing costs. There are currently no further breakdowns available.

Poverty (adults)

Relative, absolute, and severe poverty both, before and after housing costs. The adult population combines the working age and the pensionable age populations. Broken down by:

  • Age
  • Family type
  • Marital status
  • Religion

Poverty (single adults)

Relative, absolute, and severe poverty both, before and after housing costs. The single adult population contains adults who share the household with no other adults only. Broken down by:

  • Household type and gender

NOTES ON BREAKDOWNS

Age (children and adults datasets)

  • note that poverty is measured at a household level. Everyone in the same household is considered either in poverty or not in poverty. This makes it difficult to measure the poverty rate by age or gender of an individual person if they share the households with others. For example, the age analysis in the adult dataset includes adults in both, single- and multi-person households. But we know that the trend that the youngest adults have the highest poverty rates holds true for single-adult households as well.

Ethnicity (all people and children datasets)

  • Ethnicity data relates to all people in a household and is based on the ethnicity of the adult with the highest income.
  • Different ethnic groups have been combined into one for this analysis, as sample sizes are too small to reliably report on individual groups.
  • A time series is not available. This is because ethnic composition of the population is not accounted for in the survey weighting process, and therefore, poverty estimates are volatile and apparent trends not reliable.

Family employment status (children and working age adults datasets)

  • The term 'family' here refers to the core family in a household, consisting of one or two adults and their dependent children if any. A household may contain more than one family.

Family type (adults dataset)

  • The term 'family' here refers to the core family in a household, consisting of one or two adults and their dependent children if any. A household may contain more than one family.
  • 'Pensioner couples' include working-age adults who are in a couple with a pensioner.
  • 'Single' adults in this analysis refer to single-adult families, not single-adult households. In some cases, single adult families may share a household with other families. This differs from the analysis in the 'Household type and gender' worksheet, where single adults are those who share the household with no other adults.

Household disability status (all people and children datasets)

  • The way in which information on disabled people is collected changed several times during this timeseries. This causes breaks in the timeseries between 2001/02 and 2002/03, between 2003/04 and 2004/05, and between 2011/12 and 2012/13. Since 2012/13, disabled people are identified as those who report any physical or mental health condition(s) or illness(es) that last or are expected to last 12 months or more, and which limit their ability to carry out day-to-day activities. Therefore, care needs to be taken when considering long-term trends.
  • Since the last break in the methodology caused a large change in the size of the disabled population, the estimated numbers in poverty before and after the break cannot be directly compared and no three-year averaged data is available during the break.
  • Data on disabled children is available from 1995/96.

Household type and gender (single adults dataset)

  • The term 'single' here refers to adults who are sharing a household with no other adults. This differs from the analysis in the 'Family type' breakdown, where single adults may share the household with other families.

Marital status

  • 'Adults' includes working-age adults and pensioners.
  • 'Single' refers to adults who have never been married or in a civil partnership, and are not living with a partner.
  • 'Separated' refers to adults who are married or in a civil partnership, but are not living together because of estrangement.
  • 'Married / Civil Partnership' includes couples who are temporarily living apart (e.g. due to serving in the armed forces).

Religion (adults dataset)

  • Due to sample sizes, three-year averages of these statistics are not available.
  • 'Adults' include working-age adults as well as pensioners.
  • Different religious groups have been combined into one for this analysis, as sample sizes are too small to reliably report on individual groups.
  • A time series is not available. This is because religious composition of the population is not accounted for in the survey weighting process, and therefore, poverty estimates are volatile and apparent trends not reliable.

Tenure (all people and children datasets)

  • Due to a single very large household in the sample in the 'Owned outright' category in 2017/18, the latest estimates are significantly higher than those in previous years. However, further data points are required to confirm whether this marks an increasing trend in poverty.
Details
Confidentiality Policy

Data is not published where the estimate would be based on a sample size less than 100. These cases are marked with an asterisk.

Percentages have been rounded to 5 decimal points, and counts have been rounded to the nearest 10,000.

Quality Management

The United Kingdom Statistics Authority designated these statistics as National Statistics in 2012, in accordance with the Statistics and Registration Service Act 2007, signifying compliance with the Code of Practice for Official Statistics.

Designation can be broadly interpreted to mean that the statistics:

  • meet identified user needs
  • are well explained and readily accessible
  • are produced according to sound methods
  • are managed impartially and objectively in the public interest
  • are produced to the highest standard, ensuring that data confidentiality has been maintained

For further information on the methodology used to create these statistics, please see the poverty methodology pages on gov.scot.

Accuracy and Reliability

The Family Resources Survey is a sample survey including approximately 2,700 households in Scotland. The responses of these households are weighted and grossed up to be representative of all private households in Scotland.

Coming from a sample survey, the estimates are subject to sampling error. More details about the methodology including measurement uncertainty can be found on the poverty methodology pages on gov.scot.

Coherence and Comparability

The estimates in this dataset can be used to identify trends over time; however, as the data is taken from a sample survey, there are confidence intervals surrounding the estimates, and year-on-year changes are unlikely to be statistically significant. Confidence intervals are published as part of the annual poverty report.

For direct comparisons across the UK please refer to the relative low income measures in the Household Below Average Incomes publication published by the Department for Work and Pensions.

For local child poverty data please refer to the Children in Low Income Families publication by the Department for Work and Pensions. The Scottish estimates in this UK-wide dataset is calibrated to the number of children in relative poverty before housing costs in Scotland.

Accessibility and Clarity

Commentary about these estimates is available in the annual poverty report.

For further information on the methodology used to create these statistics, please see the poverty methodology pages on gov.scot.

Relevance

The Family Resources Survey, on which these estimates are based, is the official source of Scotland’s poverty, household income and income inequality statistics. The estimates are used to monitor progress in reducing poverty, child poverty and income inequality.

Timeliness and Punctuality

These statistics are updated annually in March and cover the three-year period up to the previous financial year. For example, the statistics published in March 2021 cover data from the financial years 2017/18 to 2019/20.

Revisions

In 2021, previously published datasets underwent a minor methodological revision to capture all income from child maintenance. This led to small changes in household income and small adjustments to some poverty estimates.

Therefore, some poverty estimates for 1994/95 to 2018/19 that were published in 2021 may not exactly match those in the previously published poverty dataset (now obsolete).

The revision did not affect any trends in poverty.

URI

This is a linked data resource: it has a permanent unique uri at which both humans and machines can find it on the Internet, and which can be used an identifier in queries on our SPARQL endpoint.

http://statistics.gov.scot/data/poverty-children
Dimensions Linked Data

A linked data-orientated view of dimensions and values

Dimension Locked Value
Age
http://statistics.gov.scot/def/dimension/age
(not locked to a value)
Age Of Mother
http://statistics.gov.scot/def/dimension/ageOfMother
(not locked to a value)
Age Of Youngest Child
http://statistics.gov.scot/def/dimension/ageOfYoungestChild
(not locked to a value)
Ethnicity
http://statistics.gov.scot/def/dimension/ethnicity
(not locked to a value)
Family Employment Status
http://statistics.gov.scot/def/dimension/familyEmploymentStatus
(not locked to a value)
Household Disability Status
http://statistics.gov.scot/def/dimension/householdDisabilityStatus
(not locked to a value)
Housing Costs
http://statistics.gov.scot/def/dimension/housingCosts
(not locked to a value)
Indicator (Poverty)
http://statistics.gov.scot/def/dimension/indicator(poverty)
(not locked to a value)
Number Of Children In Household
http://statistics.gov.scot/def/dimension/numberOfChildrenInHousehold
(not locked to a value)
Reference Area
http://purl.org/linked-data/sdmx/2009/dimension#refArea
(not locked to a value)
Reference Period
http://purl.org/linked-data/sdmx/2009/dimension#refPeriod
(not locked to a value)
Single Parenthood
http://statistics.gov.scot/def/dimension/singleParenthood
(not locked to a value)
Type Of Tenure
http://statistics.gov.scot/def/dimension/typeOfTenure
(not locked to a value)
Urban Rural Classification
http://statistics.gov.scot/def/dimension/urbanRuralClassification
(not locked to a value)
Work Status
http://statistics.gov.scot/def/dimension/workStatus
(not locked to a value)
Measure Type
http://purl.org/linked-data/cube#measureType
(not locked to a value)
Graphs

Linked Data is stored in graphs. We keep dataset contents (the data) separately from the metadata, to make it easier for you to find exactly what you need.

The data in this dataset are stored in the graph: http://statistics.gov.scot/graph/poverty-children

The data structure definition for this data cube dataset is stored in the same graph as the data: http://statistics.gov.scot/graph/poverty-children

All other metadata about this dataset are stored in the graph: http://statistics.gov.scot/graph/poverty-children/metadata

Linked Data Resources

A breakdown by type of the 14,034 resources in this dataset's data graph.

Resource type Number of resources
Collection 2
Component specification 20
Data set 1
Data structure definition 1
Observation 14,010
All metadata
In Graph http://statistics.gov.scot/graph/poverty-children/metadata
Accessibility and Clarity http://statistics.gov.scot/def/statistical-quality/accessibility-and-clarity
Commentary about these estimates is available in the [annual poverty report](https://data.gov.scot/poverty/). For further information on the methodology used to create these statistics, please see the [poverty methodology pages on gov.scot](https://www.gov.scot/publications/poverty-in-scotland-methodology/). xsd:string
Accuracy and Reliability http://statistics.gov.scot/def/statistical-quality/accuracy-and-reliability
The Family Resources Survey is a sample survey including approximately 2,700 households in Scotland. The responses of these households are weighted and grossed up to be representative of all private households in Scotland. Coming from a sample survey, the estimates are subject to sampling error. More details about the methodology including measurement uncertainty can be found on the [poverty methodology pages on gov.scot](https://www.gov.scot/publications/poverty-in-scotland-methodology/). xsd:string
Comment rdfs:comment http://www.w3.org/2000/01/rdf-schema#comment
Official Statistics of the number and proportions of children in poverty. Various poverty measures and breakdowns are available. xsd:string
Comparability and Coherence http://statistics.gov.scot/def/statistical-quality/comparability-and-coherence
The estimates in this dataset can be used to identify trends over time; however, as the data is taken from a sample survey, there are confidence intervals surrounding the estimates, and year-on-year changes are unlikely to be statistically significant. Confidence intervals are published as part of the [annual poverty report](https://data.gov.scot/poverty/). For direct comparisons across the UK please refer to the relative low income measures in the [Household Below Average Incomes publication](https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/households-below-average-income-hbai--2#latest-release) published by the Department for Work and Pensions. For local child poverty data please refer to the [Children in Low Income Families publication](https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/children-in-low-income-families-local-area-statistics) by the Department for Work and Pensions. The Scottish estimates in this UK-wide dataset is calibrated to the number of children in relative poverty before housing costs in Scotland. xsd:string
Confidentiality http://statistics.gov.scot/def/statistical-quality/confidentiality
Data is not published where the estimate would be based on a sample size less than 100. These cases are marked with an asterisk. Percentages have been rounded to 5 decimal points, and counts have been rounded to the nearest 10,000. xsd:string
Contact email http://publishmydata.com/def/dataset#contactEmail
mailto:social-justice-analysis@gov.scot
Creator dcterms:creator http://purl.org/dc/terms/creator
Scottish Government http://statistics.gov.scot/id/organisation/scottish-government
Date Issued dcterms:issued http://purl.org/dc/terms/issued
May 12, 2021 12:53 xsd:dateTime
Date Modified dcterms:modified http://purl.org/dc/terms/modified
March 04, 2022 13:13 xsd:dateTime
Description dcterms:description http://purl.org/dc/terms/description
National Statistics of the number and proportions of people living in private households with an equivalised household income below various poverty thresholds. For commentary and charts, please find the [full report on gov.scot](https://data.gov.scot/poverty/). The different poverty datasets refer to different subgroups of the population. Datasets are available for: * all people * children (this dataset) * working age adults * pensionable age adults * all adults * single adults More detail for each dataset and the available breakdowns follows further below. Figures are presented as three-year rolling averages to ensure robust time series analyses. Ethnicity and religion breakdowns are presented as five-year averages due to small sample sizes. Only the latest estimates of the ethnicity and religion breakdowns are provided, because estimates fluctuate between years, and the measurement uncertainty is fairly large. The reason for this is that ethnic and religious composition of the population are not accounted for in the survey weighting process, and therefore the ethnic and religious composition of the population is not accurately captured. Where estimates are suppressed due to small sample size this is marked with an asterisk ("*"). Where estimates are missing for other reasons this is marked with a hyphen ("-"). Other reasons include changes in the methodology, or data being unavailable in some years. The income measure used is equivalised net disposable income before and after housing costs. The before housing costs measure is income from all sources (including earnings, benefits, tax credits, pensions, and investments) after deductions for income tax, national insurance contributions, council tax, pension contributions and maintenance payments. The after housing costs measure further deducts housing costs such as rent and/or mortgage payments. Equivalisation sums the income of all householders, adjusts it to reflect the composition of the household, and applies the resulting income to all householders. Private Scottish Households refers to all households that are not communal establishments such as hostels, prisons or hospitals, for example. The median is the middle value when the household income of all individuals in the UK are ranked in order. Sixty percent of the median is an internationally recognised poverty threshold. Different poverty indicators measure different aspects of poverty. Relative poverty: Individuals living in households whose equivalised income is below 60% of UK median income in the same year. This is a measure of whether those in the lowest income households are keeping pace with the growth of incomes in the economy as a whole. Absolute poverty: Individuals living in households whose equivalised income is below 60% of inflation adjusted UK median income in 2010/11. This is a measure of whether those in the lowest income households are seeing their incomes rise in real terms. Severe poverty: Similar to relative poverty, but with a threshold of 50% of UK median income in the same year. This is a measure of deeper poverty, identifying people in households further below the poverty line. Relative and severe poverty (disability adjustment): Some illnesses and disabilities incur additional living costs. The poverty measures do not normally consider this. Research shows that additional costs associated with disability vary greatly in level and nature. There is no general agreement on how to measure these costs. In this measure, any payments in Disability Living Allowance, Attendance Allowance and Personal Independence Payments were deducted from total household income. These benefits are paid as a contribution towards the additional living costs for disabled people. This income is excluded from total household income, and a new poverty line based on the adjusted incomes is calculated. Combined low income and material deprivation: measures living standards of children, and refers to the inability of households to afford basic goods and activities that are seen as necessities in society. The data source is the Department for Work and Pensions' Family Resources Survey (Households Below Average Income dataset). Working age adults are defined as all individuals aged 16 and over but below state pension age, except unmarried 16 to 19 year-olds in full-time non-advanced education, who are considered children. Adults are defined as all working age and pensionable age adults. For further information on the methodology used to create these statistics, please see the [poverty methodology pages on gov.scot](https://www.gov.scot/publications/poverty-in-scotland-methodology/). More poverty analysis is available on the [poverty pages on gov.scot](https://www.gov.scot/collections/poverty-and-income-inequality-statistics/). AVAILABLE POVERTY DATASETS [Poverty (all people)](http://statistics.gov.scot/data/poverty-all-people) Relative, absolute, and severe poverty both, before and after housing costs, broken down by: * Ethnicity * Household disability status * Number of children in the household * Tenure * Urban / rural class [Poverty (children)](http://statistics.gov.scot/data/poverty-children) Relative, absolute, and severe poverty, and combined low income and material deprivation both, before and after housing costs, broken down by: * Age of child * Age of youngest child in the household * Age of mother * Ethnicity * Family employment status * Household disability status * Household work status * Number of children in the household * Single parenthood * Tenure * Urban / rural class [Poverty (working age adults)](http://statistics.gov.scot/data/poverty-working-age-adults) Relative, absolute, and severe poverty both, before and after housing costs, broken down by: * Family employment status * Household work status [Poverty (pensionable age adults)](http://statistics.gov.scot/data/poverty-pensionable-age-adults) Relative, absolute, and severe poverty both, before and after housing costs. There are currently no further breakdowns available. [Poverty (adults)](http://statistics.gov.scot/data/poverty-adults) Relative, absolute, and severe poverty both, before and after housing costs. The adult population combines the working age and the pensionable age populations. Broken down by: * Age * Family type * Marital status * Religion [Poverty (single adults)](http://statistics.gov.scot/data/poverty-single-adults) Relative, absolute, and severe poverty both, before and after housing costs. The single adult population contains adults who share the household with no other adults only. Broken down by: * Household type and gender NOTES ON BREAKDOWNS Age (children and adults datasets) * note that poverty is measured at a household level. Everyone in the same household is considered either in poverty or not in poverty. This makes it difficult to measure the poverty rate by age or gender of an individual person if they share the households with others. For example, the age analysis in the adult dataset includes adults in both, single- and multi-person households. But we know that the trend that the youngest adults have the highest poverty rates holds true for single-adult households as well. Ethnicity (all people and children datasets) * Ethnicity data relates to all people in a household and is based on the ethnicity of the adult with the highest income. * Different ethnic groups have been combined into one for this analysis, as sample sizes are too small to reliably report on individual groups. * A time series is not available. This is because ethnic composition of the population is not accounted for in the survey weighting process, and therefore, poverty estimates are volatile and apparent trends not reliable. Family employment status (children and working age adults datasets) * The term 'family' here refers to the core family in a household, consisting of one or two adults and their dependent children if any. A household may contain more than one family. Family type (adults dataset) * The term 'family' here refers to the core family in a household, consisting of one or two adults and their dependent children if any. A household may contain more than one family. * 'Pensioner couples' include working-age adults who are in a couple with a pensioner. * 'Single' adults in this analysis refer to single-adult families, not single-adult households. In some cases, single adult families may share a household with other families. This differs from the analysis in the 'Household type and gender' worksheet, where single adults are those who share the household with no other adults. Household disability status (all people and children datasets) * The way in which information on disabled people is collected changed several times during this timeseries. This causes breaks in the timeseries between 2001/02 and 2002/03, between 2003/04 and 2004/05, and between 2011/12 and 2012/13. Since 2012/13, disabled people are identified as those who report any physical or mental health condition(s) or illness(es) that last or are expected to last 12 months or more, and which limit their ability to carry out day-to-day activities. Therefore, care needs to be taken when considering long-term trends. * Since the last break in the methodology caused a large change in the size of the disabled population, the estimated numbers in poverty before and after the break cannot be directly compared and no three-year averaged data is available during the break. * Data on disabled children is available from 1995/96. Household type and gender (single adults dataset) * The term 'single' here refers to adults who are sharing a household with no other adults. This differs from the analysis in the 'Family type' breakdown, where single adults may share the household with other families. Marital status * 'Adults' includes working-age adults and pensioners. * 'Single' refers to adults who have never been married or in a civil partnership, and are not living with a partner. * 'Separated' refers to adults who are married or in a civil partnership, but are not living together because of estrangement. * 'Married / Civil Partnership' includes couples who are temporarily living apart (e.g. due to serving in the armed forces). Religion (adults dataset) * Due to sample sizes, three-year averages of these statistics are not available. * 'Adults' include working-age adults as well as pensioners. * Different religious groups have been combined into one for this analysis, as sample sizes are too small to reliably report on individual groups. * A time series is not available. This is because religious composition of the population is not accounted for in the survey weighting process, and therefore, poverty estimates are volatile and apparent trends not reliable. Tenure (all people and children datasets) * Due to a single very large household in the sample in the 'Owned outright' category in 2017/18, the latest estimates are significantly higher than those in previous years. However, further data points are required to confirm whether this marks an increasing trend in poverty. xsd:string
Graph http://publishmydata.com/def/dataset#graph
http://statistics.gov.scot/graph/poverty-children
Has a SPARQL endpoint at void:sparqlEndpoint http://rdfs.org/ns/void#sparqlEndpoint
http://statistics.gov.scot/sparql
http://publishmydata.com/def/dataset#nextUpdateDue http://publishmydata.com/def/dataset#nextUpdateDue
March 2023 xsd:string
In folder http://publishmydata.com/def/ontology/folder/inFolder
Scottish Government http://statistics.gov.scot/def/concept/folders/organisations/scottish-government
Community Wellbeing and Social Environment http://statistics.gov.scot/def/concept/folders/themes/community-wellbeing-and-social-environment
Label rdfs:label http://www.w3.org/2000/01/rdf-schema#label
Poverty (children) xsd:string
License dcterms:license http://purl.org/dc/terms/license
http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/doc/open-government-licence/version/3/
Publisher dcterms:publisher http://purl.org/dc/terms/publisher
Scottish Government http://statistics.gov.scot/id/organisation/scottish-government
Quality Management http://statistics.gov.scot/def/statistical-quality/quality-management
The United Kingdom Statistics Authority designated these statistics as National Statistics in 2012, in accordance with the Statistics and Registration Service Act 2007, signifying compliance with the Code of Practice for Official Statistics. Designation can be broadly interpreted to mean that the statistics: * meet identified user needs * are well explained and readily accessible * are produced according to sound methods * are managed impartially and objectively in the public interest * are produced to the highest standard, ensuring that data confidentiality has been maintained For further information on the methodology used to create these statistics, please see the [poverty methodology pages on gov.scot](https://www.gov.scot/publications/poverty-in-scotland-methodology/). xsd:string
References dcterms:references http://purl.org/dc/terms/references
http://statistics.gov.scot/help http://statistics.gov.scot/help
Relevance http://statistics.gov.scot/def/statistical-quality/relevance
The Family Resources Survey, on which these estimates are based, is the official source of Scotland’s poverty, household income and income inequality statistics. The estimates are used to monitor progress in reducing poverty, child poverty and income inequality. xsd:string
Revisions http://statistics.gov.scot/def/statistical-quality/revisions
In 2021, previously published datasets underwent a minor methodological revision to capture all income from child maintenance. This led to small changes in household income and small adjustments to some poverty estimates. Therefore, some poverty estimates for 1994/95 to 2018/19 that were published in 2021 may not exactly match those in the previously published poverty dataset (now obsolete). The revision did not affect any trends in poverty. xsd:string
Theme dcat:theme http://www.w3.org/ns/dcat#theme
Scottish Government http://statistics.gov.scot/def/concept/folders/organisations/scottish-government
Community Wellbeing and Social Environment http://statistics.gov.scot/def/concept/folders/themes/community-wellbeing-and-social-environment
Timeliness and Punctuality http://statistics.gov.scot/def/statistical-quality/timeliness-and-punctuality
These statistics are updated annually in March and cover the three-year period up to the previous financial year. For example, the statistics published in March 2021 cover data from the financial years 2017/18 to 2019/20. xsd:string
Title dcterms:title http://purl.org/dc/terms/title
Poverty (children) xsd:string
Type rdf:type http://www.w3.org/1999/02/22-rdf-syntax-ns#type
Data set http://purl.org/linked-data/cube#DataSet
Dataset http://publishmydata.com/def/dataset#Dataset
http://publishmydata.com/def/dataset#LinkedDataset
In Graph http://statistics.gov.scot/graph/poverty-children
Structure qb:structure http://purl.org/linked-data/cube#structure
http://statistics.gov.scot/data/structure/poverty-children http://statistics.gov.scot/data/structure/poverty-children
Type rdf:type http://www.w3.org/1999/02/22-rdf-syntax-ns#type
Data set http://purl.org/linked-data/cube#DataSet
Machine-readable formats

In addition to this bookmarkable html page, this dataset metadata is also available for our robot customers in the following machine-readable formats. Please refer to the API documentation for more details.

dataset metadata JSON RDF/XML Turtle N-Triples Atom